Trash Can Stan – Duxford’s own Superhero

Click on the link below to see the full article in the Cambridge Independent

Cambridge Independent Exclusive – 5th December 2018

Duxford Community Centre – update

Update

Further to our update in August, we are delighted to be able to tell you that we have now secured a further £82,000 from Trust Funds which means that our total to date of secured funds now stands at £260,000.

We are still awaiting responses from 9 other Trust Funds – with a potential of a further £230,000 to add to the coffers – and we would expect to have heard from them all over the next couple of months, at which point we will issue a further update.

As you will probably recall we need to reach a total of £1.1m in order to start building, so in order to bridge the gap, we intend to use a low-cost, fixed interest-rate loan facility uniquely made available to Parish Councils by the Treasury. At this stage, we have requested permission to borrow up to £700,000 although we may not need all of this depending on the contributions we receive from the outstanding Fund Providers. We will update you on the exact figure borrowed as soon as the funding is confirmed.

Were it necessary for us to borrow the entire £700,000 from the Treasury, then this would translate into a village Precept increase next year equivalent to 25p per week for a Band D house.

The result of the Village Referendum, which started the ball rolling, stated a clear preference for the Community Centre to be part-funded by an increase in Precept rather than revenue from house building, and in line with this we are pleased with the opportunity to secure this significant amount of money, with a relatively low Precept increase next year.

Community Centre Team

Grants to help tackle loneliness

Applications from new or existing community schemes that provide a Mobile Warden service are welcomed until 5pm on 25 January 2019.

Community groups in South Cambridgeshire can now bid for a share of £20,000 as part of a scheme that helps keep older residents in their own homes, and tackles loneliness.

The funding is available from the District Council’s Mobile Wardens grants scheme. Local groups that run these initiatives can bid for the money to help pay for them.

Mobile Wardens regularly visit elderly people, helping to keep them living in the community they know, and which knows them. They receive training to understand the needs of the people they visit and can help point out what other services they may be eligible for that could help keep them living at home.

The Wardens may also help with practical tasks like light shopping, booking appointments, form-filling and the collection of prescriptions.

Last year, the Council supported 11 Mobile Warden schemes covering 20 villages, with around 260 elderly residents benefiting from the service.

The Warden schemes are complementary to statutory care services, and don’t duplicate or replace the medical or social care services that individuals may also require.

South Cambridgeshire District Council’s Lead Cabinet Member for Customer Service and Business Improvement, Cllr Philippa Hart, said: “We know Mobile Wardens are hugely valued for supporting older people to live independently in their homes, and in the community they know. As well as providing practical help, they are also a fantastic source of friendship and social contact to people who feel isolated. We are determined to embed health and wellbeing into everything we do as a Council and this is another good example of how we’re doing that. I’d urge community groups who will be running Mobile Warden schemes next year to get their application for funding in as soon as they can.”

Applications from new or existing community schemes that provide a Mobile Warden service are welcomed until 5pm on 25 January 2019.

Visit www.scambs.gov.uk/community/grants/mobile-warden-scheme-grants/ for the criteria, guidance notes and application form.

 

Are your hedgehogs ready for winter?

Hedgehog Hibernation: all the facts

As winter is nearly here, hedgehogs will be starting to think about hibernation – some may have started already!

What is hibernation?

Hedgehogs are one of the few mammals that are true hibernators. During hibernation hedgehogs are not really asleep, instead they drop their body temperature to match their surroundings and enter a state of torpor. This allows them to save a lot of energy but slows down all other bodily functions making normal activity impossible.

Those hedgehogs visiting your garden over the next month will be trying to get as much body fat built up as possible so that they can be ready to hibernate, so please do keep providing food until you start to notice that the food stops being taken, or gradually less and less is eaten – then you can gradually stop putting food out altogether.

Where will my hedgehogs hibernate?

Hedgehogs aren’t fussy. A log pile, under your shed, in a compost heap or manmade hedgehog house can all provide a safe place for hedgehogs to nest in over winter.  If you want to make your own hedgehog house in time for winter, download our instructions here.

Do hedgehogs sleep the whole time?

Hedgehogs will be relatively inactive over winter, especially when temperatures drop very low. However, on milder days it is possible that hedgehogs can wake up early and look for a quick bite to eat before returning to slumber.  Research also shows that during the hibernation period, hedgehogs can move between nests every few weeks, and even use nests built by other ‘hogs.

So what should I do while hedgehogs are hibernating?

It’s not necessary to put food out over winter as it will more than likely go to waste with hedgehogs hibernating. However, we do recommend providing water all year round.  On very mild days, or when you notice hedgehog activity in your garden, you may want to put some food out for a short time until it gets cold again.  Just make sure to never disturb a nesting hedgehog, so avoid opening up the hedgehog house or clearing the garden or leaf or log piles as they may have some sleeping ‘hogs inside!

Who should I call if I am worried about a hedgehog?

If you are ever worried about the health or welfare of a hedgehog, please call the British Hedgehog Preservation Society on 01584 890801 and they will be able to give you advice, and put you in touch with a local rescue centre if necessary.

I hope this helps to answer some of your hibernation questions!

Best wishes,

Emily

Hedgehog Street

P.S. Having a bonfire? Always remember to check it for hedgehogs before burning! Or better still, re-site pile on day it’s to be lit, light from one side only to allow escape route for anything you may have missed!

Credit: Richard, Purvess, Hedgehog Champion
Credit: Ann Stratford, Hedgehog Champion

How to make a DIY hedgehog house

Your garden can provide lots of nesting spots for ‘hogs – under your shed or shrubs or in compost heaps, but, sometimes hedgehogs need our help.  To make your own in time for hibernation download our simple instructions.

HEDGEHOG HOUSE INSTRUCTIONS
Credit: Pat Morris, Hedgehog Champion

Have you got a hedgehog highway?

Hedgehogs can travel up to a mile in just one night so our fences are getting in their way. Make a Hedeghog Highway today and log it on the BIG Hedgehog Map so we can find out where hedgehogs are going.

MAP YOUR HEDGEHOG HOLE
Emily Wilson, Hedgehog Officer

“Remember, if you have a sick, injured or orphaned hedgehog please call the British Hedgehog Preservation Society on 01584 890 801 or if non urgent email info@britishhedgehogs.org.uk – there is also a Frequently Asked Questions page on their website for more advice.”

– Emily, Hedgehog Officer

Roadworks and Highway events

http://www.roadworks.org/

Please follow the link above and check the map for current road works and road closures.

https://www.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/residents/travel-roads-and-parking/roads-and-pathways/highway-events/

The link above has an interactive map that will show events that will have an impact on the highway network in the next 3 months.

 

 

 

District survey – number of rough sleepers

Each year the Council is required to count or estimate the number of rough sleepers in their district on a specified night.

South Cambridgeshire District Council will be estimating the number of people sleeping rough in the district on the evening, overnight between 22nd/ 23rd November 2018.   The Parish Council has been asked to notify the District if anyone is sleeping rough in our Parish on this evening.

The Government definition of a rough sleeper is as follows:

People sleeping, about to bed down (sitting on/in or standing next to their bedding) or actually bedded down in the open air (such as on the streets, in tents, doorways, parks, bus shelters or encampments). People in buildings or other places not designed for habitation (such as stairwells, barns, sheds, car parks, cars, derelict boats, stations, or “bashes”).

The definition does not include people in hostels or shelters, people in campsites or other sites used for recreational purposes or organised protest, squatters or Travellers.

You are invited to contribute – our estimate must only include those rough sleeping on that single night. Our typical night has been chosen taking into account local factors, a weekday and it is the same night as some of our neighbouring authorities are estimating or counting their figures.

Where possible and to prevent double counting it would be helpful if you can provide the following information when notifying us of any rough sleepers:-

  • Their location
  • Gender
  • Age brackets (under 18/ 18-25/ 25 and over)
  • Nationality (UK National/ EU National/ Non-EU National).

Please send any notifications of rough sleepers on the night in question to your Parish Clerk:

Clerk@duxfordvillage.com or use the ‘contact us’ tab at the top of the page

More information on cold weather provision in the link below:

cold weather provision for 2018

Dual purpose dog waste/litter bins

Please note that the green open sided bins that have been installed by SCDC (entrance to the Biggen, end of Mangers Lane, Hinxton Road by the tennis courts and Hinxton Road end of the footpath near the level crossing) may be used for both general litter and dog-waste.

The Parish Council have requested stickers for the bins to make it clear that they take dog waste as well, but these have not yet been installed.

Confused about recycling?

In the following links you can find information on what can and cannot be recycled, as well as how to reduce waste overall.

South Cambs Recycles Plastic!

Waste Less!